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The 12 English verb tenses - are there really only 12 tenses in English?

12 Tenses in English (or are there 16, 24 or even 26?)

Introduction

English language has a wide range of tenses that are used to show the time of an action or event. Tenses allow us to communicate of an action in a sentence. Understanding the different tenses in English can be challenging, but it is essential to communicate effectively. In this blog post, we will discuss the English. Section 1: Simple Present Tense

The Simple Present Tense is used to describe an action that is happening right now or is a habitual action. For example: "I eat breakfast every day." This tense is formed with the subject followed base form of the verb. It is important to note that the third person singular pronouns (he, she, it) take an -s or -es at the end of the verb. For example: "She eats day." The Simple Present Tense can also be used to express general truths or facts. For example: "The sun rises in the east." Section 2: Present Continuous Tense The Present Continuous Tense is also known as the Present Progressive Tense. It is used to describe actions that are happening currently. For example: "I am writing this blog post." This tense is formed with the subject followed by the verb "to be" in the present tense and the present participle (-ing of the verb. The Present Continuous Tense be used to describe future plans. For example: "I am meeting my friend tomorrow." It is important to note that the Present Continuous Tense is not used for habitual actions. Section 3: Simple Past Tense The Simple Past Tense is used to describe completed actions in the past. For example: "I walked to the store yesterday." This tense is formed with the past tense of the verb. It is important to note that irregular verbs have different forms in the past tense. For example: "I ate breakfast this morning." Additionally, the Simple Past Tense can be used to describe past habits or actions that occurred over a period of time. For example: "I played soccer for ten years when I was younger." Section 4: Past Continuous Tense The Past Continuous Tense is also known as the Past Progressive Tense. It is used to describe actions that were happening in the past over a period of time. For example: "I was studying for my exam all night." This tense is formed with the past tense of the verb "to be" and the present participle (-ing) form of the verb. The Past Continuous Tense can also be used to describe two actions that were happening at the same time in the past. For example: "I was studying while my friend was watching TV." Section 5: Present Perfect Tense The Present Perfect Tense is used to describe actions that started in the past and continue up to the present. For example: "I have lived in this city for ten years." This tense is formed with the present tense of the verb "" and the past participle form of the verb. The Present Perfect Tense can also be used to describe actions that occurred in the past but have relevance to the present. For example: "I have finished my homework, so I can watch TV now." Section 6: Present Perfect Continuous Tense The Present Perfect Continuous Tense is also known as the Present Perfect Progressive Tense. It is used to describe actions that started in the past and continue up to the present. For example: "I have been studying for three hours." This tense is formed with the present tense of the verb "to have," the past participle the verb "to be," and the present participle (-ing) form of the main verb. The Present Perfect Continuous Tense can also be used to describe actions that have just stopped or have recently ended. For example: "I have been playing soccer, but now I am tired." Section 7: Past Perfect Tense The Past Perfect Tense is used to describe actions that were completed before another action in the past. For example: "I had finished my homework before I went to bed." This tense is formed with the past tense of the verb "to have" past participle form of the main verb> The Past Perfect Tense can also be used to describe hypothetical situations in the past. For example: "If I had studied harder, I would have passed the exam." Section 8: Past Perfect Continuous Tense The Past Perfect Continuous Tense is also known as the Past Perfect Progressive Tense. It is used to describe actions that were in progress before another action in the past. For example: "I had been studying for three hours before my friend called me." This tense is formed with the past tense of the verb "to have," the past participle form of the verb "to be," and the present participle (-ing) form of the main verb. The Past Perfect Continuous Tense can also be used to describe actions that continued up to a certain time in the past. For example: "I had been eating pizza every day for a month before I got sick of it." Section 9: Future Simple Tense The Future Simple Tense is used to describe actions that will happen in the future. For example: "I will go to the store tomorrow." This tense is formed with the auxiliary verb "will" and the base form of the main verb. The Future Simple Tense can also be used to make promises or predictions. For example: "I will help you with your homework." Section 10: Future Continuous Tense

The Future Continuous Tense is also known as the Future Progressive Tense. It is used to describe actions that will be in progress at a certain time in the future. For example: "I will be studying at this time tomorrow." This tense is formed with the auxiliary verb "will," the verb "to be" in the present tense, and the present participle (-ing) form of the main verb. The Future Continuous Tense can also be used to describe actions that will be happening over a period of time in the future. For example: "I will be living in this city for three years."

Section 11: Future Perfect Tense

The future perfect simple (will/won't have + past participle) is used to talk about something that will be completed by a specific time in the future. The guests are coming at 8 p.m. I'll have finished cooking by then. On 9 October we'll have been married for 50 years. By the end of this article you will have read about all 12 English tenses.

Section 12: Future Perfect Continuous Tense

The future perfect continuous, also sometimes called the future perfect progressive, is a verb tense that describes actions that will continue up until a point in the future. The future perfect continuous consists of will + have + been + the verb's present participle (verb root + -ing). Conclusion Knowing the different tenses in English is essential for effective communication. Each tense has a specific use and conveys information about the timing of an action or event. By understanding the 12 tenses in English, you can better convey your thoughts and ideas.

For our more advanced readers, there are a few more tenses to be discussed and we shall tackle these in our next blog post on the future in the past tense.

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